Along the Shores of Gichigami

Gichigami is the Anishinaabe name for the largest freshwater lake in the world. It has been given the name Lake Superior by the United States and Canada. The Anishinaabe are the First Nations Peoples who are from the areas surrounding this great lake. They are also known as Ojibwe, Ojibwa or Chippewa. I vaguely remember hearing Longfellow’s 1855 poem about this lake and more clearly remember a racist I Love Lucy sketch. It saddens me that I didn’t know, until 62 years of age, that this is a real place and with real people.

We have had a lovely 2 weeks driving and staying along this amazing lake. Our Gichigami drive started in Minnesota, continued in Ontario, Canada and concluded in Michigan. We’ve only driven about 2/3s of the lake!

We stayed at wonderful campgrounds with winding trails that led to the lake.

Along the way we got to learn a little Anishinaabe history. They were integral to the vibrant fur trading industry of the 1800s.

In Pukaskwa National Park, Ontario, Canada there is a beautiful trail called Bimose Kinoomagewnan (Walk of Teachings) trail. Along it you can read and learn of the Seven Grandfather Teachings from Anishinaabe elders and enjoy art work, representing the teachings, from the younger generation. The teachings are love, honesty, respect, wisdom, truth,humility and bravery.

In Sault Saint Marie, Michigan we saw the locks which enable ships to travel from Gichigami to the lower great lakes.

We are now on Anishinaabe land, staying at the Kewadin RV Park and Casino. It’s a beautiful and restful place. We are looking forward to attending a pow wow on Saturday. I’m really humbled by how little I know about this area and First Nations Peoples. I’m really grateful for any opportunity to learn even a little bit more!

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The ABCs (and more) of RVs

There are many different types of recreational vehicles and probably almost as many articles written about them. It took me awhile to learn the difference between a class C motor home (like the Minnie Winnie we have) and a behemoth class A (like the one in the hilarious movie RV) and then there are all the trailers.

There are 3 basic types of motor homes and they come in all sizes. Class As are the ones that resemble buses. They are built on a chassis and have large front and rear windows. They often have slide outs and can be quite large and luxurious.

Class Bs are also called campervans. They are easy to park and drive and are great for weekend trips. Not so good for full-time RVers like us.

Our Minnie Winnie is an older class C. The way I can identify class Cs are by their cab over design. They come in many sizes, with and without slide outs.

Then there are all types of pull behind trailers like cute little teardrops.

In Minnesota we have seen several of these ice fishing trailers. They drive them right onto the ice in the winter!

There are pull behinds that pop up into tents and pull behinds that are long and luxurious inside. I really love the retro ones!

Fifth wheel trailers are another option. Instead of being towed the coupling is actually in the bed of the truck.

I had fun taking most of these pictures here at at Lake Bemidji State Park. Kathy and I are always exclaiming over fancy new ones and really cute older ones. You can get lots of information on line or by visiting an RV dealership. We are really happy to answer answer any questions you may have.

BOLT Adventures in Serendipity

Kathy and I are very blessed to live a life which affords a lot of opportunities for serendipity.  When we were working, vacations and travel took a lot of planning with deadlines and time constraints. Retirement is truly glorious! We rarely have set time lines and we often make spontaneous plans, one day at a time. 

 Our puppy, Kahlo, is a great example of the gift of serendipity. We had no plans of getting her and yet she has brought so much joy to our lives! 

Whale Watching in Guerrero Negro, Baja California Sur, Mexico 

The White Temple, Chiang Rai, Thailand 

Charlotte and Pete Hill O’Neal, Arusha, Tanzania  

Serendipity has given us fabulous adventures,  visits to so many great places, and led us to meeting unforgettable and wonderful new friends. 

Now we are in Minnesota, a place I thought we’d simply be traveling through. We love it here! There are beautiful parks, affordable campgrounds, friendly people and lots to see and do.  Thanks to serendipity, we’ll be here a few weeks.

We’d love to hear about your experiences of serendipity as well as any comments, suggestions or questions you may have. As always, thank you so much for taking the time to read this blog and for your support. 

Through BOLT Eyes…

Kathy and I love the National Park Service. There is such an abundance of nature, history and wonder within the parks, monuments and forests that it administers. We’ve found something to love in every place that we’ve visited. 


However, there are often things we find disturbing to our Black American and People of Color consciousness. This week we visited the Little Big Horn Battlefield Site.  It was essentially a monument to the fallen soldiers of “Custer’s Last Stand” and to American  imperialism. There was little mention of all the injustices perpetrated against First Nations Peoples that led up to the battle. The memorial to Native Americans there was much smaller and felt like an afterthought. 

When I was in the gift shop I watched a little white boy playing with the toy guns and knives for sale there. All I could think of was Tamir Rice and how it is not safe for  black children to play in this way. 

We visited “Pompey’s Pillar”, an ancient geological site sacred to the Crow people. The park service felt it more important to highlight the fact that explorer William Clark (of Lewis and Clark) wrote his name there.

Now we are at Theodore Roosevelt National Park. It’s breathtakingly beautiful here! It’s very fitting that “Teddy”a great conservationist is honored here. But he also embodied military might and colonialism. Kathy reminded me that the saying he is credited with “Speak softly, and carry a big stick.” is one he appropriated from West Africa. 

So what do we do with these thoughts and feelings? We try to find beauty and enjoy it where we can and to tell the truth about our history and our present.  We try to learn more about our own and other marginalized people’s history. We show up and make use of these parks and forests, knowing that our ancestors did much to make them possible. We write these blogs, share our pictures and adventures. We try our best to share our truth.  We hope to affirm that America is beautiful, still and America is ours.


A Wonderful Week of BOLT! 

BOLT had a wonderful week, one that makes me appreciate RV life even more. We’ve stayed at a variety of places and had nothing but positive experiences. I am reminded that, despite the insanity of our current political situation, all the tragedies and injustice, America is beautiful.

From Walmart parking lots (great spots for RV overnight stays) to private RV parks with pools and casinos we’ve encountered friendly, helpful people and great natural beauty. RVing is a great, relatively inexpensive, way to see the country and meet interesting people. 

This week we traveled five states (Nevada, Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana), visited 2 fabulous national parks (Grand Teton and Yellowstone), went to a wonderful museum (the California Trail Interpretive Center) and stayed in 2 national forests (Targhee and Gallatin).  We hope you enjoy these pictures of our week. We love getting your comments and please, ask any questions you may have. 

Sometimes Walmarts are the best overnight option.  This one in Layton, Utah was great!

We both really enjoyed the interactive exhibits at the California Trail Interpretive Center in Elko, Nevada. 


The Grand Tetons were magnificent and we got to see bison.

There is nothing like waking up in forest and seeing these for neighbors. This is Beaver Creek Campground, Gallitin National Forest, Montana. 

A highlight of our week was our visit to Yellowstone National Park. It has great boardwalk walking paths, views of the Snake River, lots of crowds and of course “Old Faithful”.

We find the national forest campgrounds to be wonderful: very beautiful and inexpensive too.  This one in the Targhee National Forest on the Idaho – Wyoming border was only $12 a night.  This compares really favorably to the private RV park prices. The one we stayed at in Elko, Nevada was $30 a night for really just a big parking lot but it did have a pool and great staff.

So that was our week, we hope yours was fabulous as well! 

On the road again! 

As you can see from this picture, Kahlo likes road trips as much as Kathy and I.  We really enjoyed our time in Southern California, seeing family and friends.  But we are excited to be on our next BOLT adventure. 
Right now we heading north on beautiful Highway 395. The scenery is amazing! We’ve seen pristine lakes, the majestic Sierras and even some snow.

Our intention is to slowly travel up to and then through Canada. I’m really looking forward to seeing Niagara Falls. We plan to be back in the USA in time for a visit to the Smithsonian African American Museum in late September and back in California by November.   As always we are traveling serendipitously, fearlessly and fairly pennilessly.

Follow us on Facebook  and Instagram for our current locations.  Please let know if you have suggestions of things to see or places to visit (especially if you are on our route).

Coche Lento, Casa Rápida (Slow Car, Fast House)

I’ve always wanted to travel in an R.V.  What I imagined was long days of driving, visiting lots of beautiful sites for brief periods. The reality has been much more wonderful than I had imagined. R.V. traveling, BOLT style has come to mean slow travel with fairly long stays in beautiful places.  I know this type of travel is not possible for everyone and I am extremely grateful for the privilege. If you are someone who is considering a full time R.V. lifestyle here are some of the top reasons why I have come to believe slow travel with extended stops is best.



Longer stays mean you really get to experience, explore and enjoy the place.  You find favorite stores and restaurants. You get to see sunrises, starry skyes, sunny or rainy days.  During almost every longer stay we’ve been able to participate in festivals or other community activities. You really get a feel for the place.



There are substantial savings to long stays. Obviously you are using far less gas and that’s not a small thing in our 30 foot R.V.  A tank of gas currently costs us about $100 and takes us about 250 miles.  Every day we stay parked is a good day for our budget. Also, most R.V. parks offer substantial discounts when you stay a week or longer.  We find places that include water and electricity in the rate, which cuts down on our propane and water costs. When we find a spot within walking distance of shops and town activities we are truly in finance paradise. 


While we’ve met interesting, friendly people on brief stays, one of the great things about longer stays is you can really get to know people. There is camaraderie among RVers and a lot of helpful information gets exchanged. 

I think the best thing about longer stays is the chance to slow down and really enjoy the simple pleasures of life. I love our quiet, slow mornings; long, aimless walks; lots of time for reading, and sharing BOLT life with my beloved, Kathy.


If  you have any questions about RV life or experiences of your own to share we’d love to hear from you.  Your support and interest are always appreciated.